Common-sense emergency preparedness from a combat veteran

What is the best SHTF/disaster communication?

What is the best prepper/SHTF communication system?What is the best emergency/SHTF communication?

So if you found yourself in the middle of a wide-scale disaster situation such as a hurricane or other emergency that you had no government coming to help for a while, how would you communicate with your family or others? What would you do if the grid goes down and you wanted to get your family together to help survive? You won’t be able to rely on your cell phone. A book you might want to look into that goes into more detail than this article will is Personal Emergency Communications: Staying in Touch Post-Disaster: Technology, Gear and Planning.

Ryan Nelsen (R) and Fields Harrington ride a tandem bicycle to generate power as people wait for their cell phones to recharge in New York after Hurricane Sandy (Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Even short-term emergencies have shown the limitations of using cell phones to coordinate with each other.

During many recent events, cell phone service wasn’t an option for many for days. The system became seriously overloaded on 9/11 so calls wouldn’t go through, 70% of the towers went down during Katrina and comms were down for days, and most areas haven’t been adequately improved across the US.

These won’t be isolated events. Don’t think that because you live in a large metropolitan area that you’re safer. A quick look at some of the things that went on during Hurricane Sandy in NY will show that the government has a lot to deal with in addition to just trying to get your cell phone service back up so even though that was a pretty short-term event, it caused a lot of problems.

Here are just a few issues that would affect you being able to pull out your iPhone to call up people:

  • Cell phone communication has a lot of vulnerabilities that make it a poor solution for widespread or long-term emergencies.
  • Heavy winds or flooding can disrupt the cables between towers such as during Hurricane Sandy.
  • Cell towers require AC power to operate so if they don’t have an automatic backup system, they stop. Keep in mind that a lot of towers are just glorified antennas on the tops of buildings or mountains and backup power, such as an emergency generator, is a very short-term solution. Generators require fuel and that fuel has to be replenished quite often. In a lot of cases, the only backup power available is a bank of batteries that stop charging when the main power system stops.
  • Backhaul systems (essentially the system that connects and/or allows overflow from outer systems to the core, often including other carriers) aren’t always reliable. A lot of this system is wired but has been expanded to microwave and other systems.
  • Most cell phones will only stay charged for a day or three. If you don’t have local power to keep it up, when the system does come back up, you won’t be able to talk to it.
  • Cell phones require satellites, which are vulnerable to hackers, physical attack, or solar storms.

Now don’t get me wrong, for day-to-day emergencies, such as getting a flat tire, a cell phone usually works pretty well. It’s just a crappy solution for big emergencies. They’ll be pretty useless if the national grid goes down due to a cyber attack, EMP or CME, which is actually a lot more likely than you might think.

So if you can’t rely on cell phone service, what other options do you have?

What about using CB radio for emergency comms?


A lot of people grew up watching BJ and the Bear and they remember seeing all the truckers talking over the air with each other. CB radio is definitely more available during an emergency but they have a lot of limitations.

For one, not a lot of people are on CB. You might be able to find someone in a truck but even that’s harder to find. The problem isn’t just the lack of people who use it, it’s the lack of people in your range that use it.

One of the big reasons your range is very limited with CB vs other systems is that they’re limited to 5 watts input which is about 4 watt out. That may be just some vague notion but more power means more distance. At the frequencies that CB radios use, you can only expect to get between 1 and 10 miles or so, depending on the terrain. There could be a million people in the US with their CB’s all on the same channel at the same time, but if they’re not within range, you won’t be talking.

You might think that you could just hack into your ham radio and pump out more power, but the FCC goes after people who do that (just a few examples). Obviously if SHTF, you’re not gonna really care about that but remember that adding more power to your system to transmit doesn’t do anything to help you hear the other guy with a normal CB.

How good are satellite phones in an emergency?


For a lot of emergency situations, satellite phones are pretty good. The first problem with them though is cost. They’re mighty expensive. Not only do you have to shell out for the phone, you have to pay for service and minutes. If you’re stranded somewhere though, it may be worth the cost. I had one with me at all times when I was in Uganda, and it came in hella handy at times. They don’t like jungles and contrary to what every freaking movie shows, they don’t work indoors or inside a ship like they kept showing in World War Z (which was a decent movie but thing like that drive me crazy).

The real problem is that it’s highly unlikely you’d need it in a normal household so they’re ONLY good for emergencies.

Another big problem is that just like cell phones, they rely on the satellites to function so if the satellites stop working, then so do the satellite phones. Obviously.

Should you buy GMRS/FRS/MURS radios to keep in touch?

For local communication, GMRS, FRS and MURS radios are pretty good. They don’t require an FCC license for FRS and MURS, they’re cheap, and easy to use. They’ve pretty much replaced CB radios. As such, even though they’re an improvement, they have a lot of the same limitation on power and range.

If you have a true GMRS radio, you may be able to tap into a repeater, which will expand your range to possibly hundreds of miles, but the repeater obviously has to be running, and you have to be within range of the repeater for your radio to hit it. GMRS radios are also allowed to operate at higher power than a lot of other radios. You also need a license to use GMRS frequencies.

Basically, if you’re considering one of these radio systems for emergency use, go with a true GMRS radio and get the license.

Are Ham / Amateur Radios the best way to talk to your friends/family when disaster strikes?


So now that I’ve gone through several options that you could choose, but obviously from the title I don’t recommend, let’s look at ham radio. Which I do recommend.

The bad:

Ham radio operation requires a license, but as you can see in this article, they’re easy to get. This isn’t quite as daunting as it seems, especially considering you don’t need to learn Morse code anymore, but it still requires some studying.

There are three levels of licensing; Technician, General and Amateur. The higher license you get, the more frequencies you can use. This is important.

Amateur Radio Frequencies as of 5 March 2012

So why is this important? In non-emergency life, you have to be concerned that the FCC will go after you if you transmit on a frequency that you’re not allowed to operate. For you to be ready for a SHTF scenario, you need to have the equipment and practice with it in order to make sure you’ll be able to get through.

Just like with FCC investigators and volunteers who track down offenders (you have to call out your FCC every 10 minute on the air or you’ll probably get some unwanted attention), if you find yourself in martial law and don’t want to be found, they can track you down pretty easily. ABSOLUTELY read this book if you’re a prepper and going to use ham radio for comms:  Stealth Amateur Radio: Operate From Anywhere.

So why does it matter about what frequencies? Just like with CB radios and the others, the frequency will affect how far you can transmit/receive a signal. This can be pretty complicated so it’s best to get a good book on antennas and propagation, and work with more experienced people to help you get going.

The good:

There are a LOT of people around the world who use amateur radio. These people are typically in tune with dealing with emergencies or working with communicating with people in different scenarios. Because of the range ham radios can get, it’s a LOT easier to get a hold of someone during an emergency. These people are also extremely resourceful so even if they don’t have a working radio (such as after an EMP pulse), they can make one.

I currently have three ham radios. An inexpensive Baofeng UV-5R handheld that I keep on my Harley, a great Yaesu VX-6R waterproof handheld with an upgraded antenna that I keep in my bugout bag, and a portable Yaesu FT-857d HF, VHF, UHF all-mode 100W radio that I can run off a 12v battery. A big part of getting your signal out and hearing others is the antenna so if you get a handheld, I’d suggest upgrading the antenna. Keep in mind if you get a Baofeng that their antenna connections are different.

With the proper knowledge (which you can pretty much only get with practice), you can make a radio out of stuff you can find pretty much anywhere that will transmit on frequencies that you can reach other people.

Repeaters:


There are a lot of repeaters around the world that can help you transmit long distances with just a little radio. Basically, a repeater will listen to the little radios in its immediate surroundings and then blast the signal out for hundreds, or thousands, of miles. Obviously the repeaters need to be functioning to do this but people who have repeaters are usually up on emergency communication and will have backup power systems. If they go down, they usually know how to fix it.

There are even repeaters that use the internet so if you tap into a repeater and type in the address of a remote repeater in another country, what you say on your little radio will blast out to that point on the other side of the world. I talked to a guy in Australia on the first day I got my Yaesu handheld that way.

Using stealth to operate an amateur radio:


Because ham radio people are crafty lot (and some places don’t allow antennas), there is a whole sub-genre of ways to make antennas so they can’t be detected (by sight, not by signal). Antennas can be made out of flagpoles, ladders, fences, railings, and a lot of other things in plain sight. They can also be hidden inside things or buried.

There are several books such as Low Profile Amateur Radio: Operating a Ham Station from Almost Anywhere that can show you how to do these. Obviously, the more experience you have with radios, the easier it’ll be for you to do something like this.

The Ham radio community:

As I’ve mentioned, amateur radio operators are not only creative and resourceful, they’re very in tune with handling emergency situations. There are several groups that use ham radio for dealing with disasters or for search and rescue. The two biggest are Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) and Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES).

Creative ways to communicate with ham frequencies:

With the right equipment and some practice, you can easily get around the world.

In addition to the plethora of ham radio equipment and information available, a good basis of theory can get you talking to people even if all electricity and electronics are taken out. Here are some examples of what you can do with a little knowledge:

What is a Foxhole Radio and how do you make one?

A foxhole radio was used by GI’s during WWII and beyond. The cool thing is that it doesn’t require a power source and is made from simple parts like a pencil and razor blade. It’s only a receiver though.

What about Crystal Radios?

There are many, many, many ways to make a radio out of household items. Way too many to list them here. Suffice it to say that with all the wires and old electronics laying around, making a simple radio receiver is pretty simple. Just like the foxhole radio, these pretty much only receive. They can also be made to use power from the signal itself so they don’t all need anything else to power them.

How do you make a Homemade AM transmitter?

Fear not dudes and dudettes, you can still make a transmitter out of stuff you can find in a lot of homes or junkyards:

What the heck is a spark-gap transmitter

Spark-gap transmitters are pretty simple to make. The good thing is that they transmit over a HUGE frequency range so pretty much anyone nearby is gonna hear it. The bad things are that they’re illegal (for the same reason) and can zap the heck out of you if you’re not careful. You also have to learn Morse code or create your own in order to have anyone have any idea what you’re trying to say.

If you want to get started learning about ham radio as an effective emergency communications system for you or your family, check out the Prepared Ham Forum. My buddy AD owns the site, and it’s great for learning and asking questions. Lots of helpful people on there to help out.

So, there are many different ways to communicate during a disaster situation or if society collapses but for the most flexible and effective way, you should seriously look into getting your ham radio license and start playing with it. It’s a great hobby and one that could be the difference between finding your family in an emergency or losing them. Either way, make sure whatever you do that you come up with an emergency communications plan beforehand. It may save your family or your life someday.

Check out the book Stealth Amateur Radio: Operate From Anywhere though if you’re going to be operating a ham radio at a bug out location.

How to start a niche website – the right way

How to start a prepper website - the right way

By the end of this post, you will know enough to be able to come up with a great idea for what your website will be about and register a good domain name with a web host. You'll even install a WordPress website (that's actually the easy part - I even … [Continue reading]

Prepper gear review: The eartheasy SunBell lamp and phone charger

sunbell lamp and charger review featured image

Yesterday, I put a link on my facebook page to a web hosting company that I've been doing a lot of research on, just as a kind of feeler. Because I connected that link (and the other cool ones I did there) to google analytics, I could see if anyone … [Continue reading]

The top 10 prepper skills and abilities FNG needs to survive

Top 10 Prepper Skills for FNG to Survive

So I was perusing the survival and prepper websites the other day (as I do every day) and came across a couple articles on prepper skills. Then I saw on facebook that a couple people were asking pretty much the same thing: what are the most important … [Continue reading]

Send secure messages even without cell service with goTenna

Send secure messages even without cell service with goTenna

I got an email from the goTenna marketing/consulting/whatever folks today about some new communications thing that's coming out. At first I thought it was just some radio thing (I constantly get emails from Chinese suppliers that think I want to … [Continue reading]

Victorinox Swisschamp XAVT Swiss Army knife review

Victorinox Swisschamp XAVT swiss army knife review

When I was young, I was in the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) in Colorado and was dating a curly-haired girl a little older than me named Carla. I think her name was Carla. It was a very interesting time in my life.This was the early me back then. God, I was … [Continue reading]

Beware False Knowledge

beware of false prophets

Beware False Knowledge With summer in full swing, my teenage son has found a lot of free time on his hands. (Even after the chores given to him by an “over-demanding” father.  LOL)  So some of his free time has been spent watching TV. Now I’m not … [Continue reading]

Why you need to have a SHTF/emergency food supply plan

planning for a food shortage

Food is one of the most important considerations in a long-term survival situation. It’s also an important consideration for those in short-term emergencies who want to maintain some semblance of normalcy - especially those who have family. If … [Continue reading]

Neighborhood Watch – Not just for nosey old ladies

neighborhood watch sign

As both Graywolf and I have spoken of here many times, OPSEC is of course of tantamount importance. I’m a firm believer that if everyone knows you stockpile beans and bullets, then during a catastrophe you are no longer a neighbor or a friend. … [Continue reading]

60 bug out bag gear items might not have considered

60 bug out bag gear items you probably don't have

There are a lot of good articles with lists and other information out there to help you figure out what you should put in your bugout bag or in your other gear. I've written a couple myself, they don't always get you to think outside the box. This … [Continue reading]

DIY portable camping PVC pipe evap air conditioner

PVC swamp cooler

Ok, so I saw the 5 gallon bucket air conditioner swamp cooler that figjam did a couple years ago and thought it was a fantastic idea. I wanted to see if I could improve on that. I finally got it. This is it, in my RV right now running off a car … [Continue reading]

University research to confront prepper stereotypes

They said I was a crazy prepper

Michael Mills is a Ph.D. candidate and Assistant Lecturer in the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research at University of Kent (England). He is conducting 3 years of research on the preparedness community in America and Britain, which … [Continue reading]

If you have any questions, would like to send me something to review, or for any other reason, please contact me at graywolfsurvival@gmail.com or on my google+, facebook, or twitter links above.
Disclosure: This is a professional review site that sometimes receives compensation from the companies whose products we review and recommend. We are independently owned and the opinions expressed here are our own.