Common-sense emergency preparedness from a combat veteran

9 ultralight backpacking tents for hiking or your bug out bag

Tent tech has come a long way. Here are 9 great tents for your backpack or bug out bag that will make camping more survivable - and more enjoyable ... 9 ultralight backpacking tent for hiking or bug out bags - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657If you had to leave home quickly, as a prepper you’d probably have at least a cheap EDC kit on you and a small go bag that you could grab. There is certainly some utility in going ultra-light like that but unfortunately that system doesn’t allow you to have much of a shelter and you can only expect to be able to live with just that gear if you’ve spent a lot of time learning a lot of survival skills.

Sure, you might get lucky and find something out there or just toss up a cheap tarp, but what if you needed more? Staying in what we call in the army ‘the suck’ is one thing, but planning on having your life suck is entirely something else. Sleeping in just a bivy sack might be fine for some but I’d like a bit more than that.

The Rush 72 – great bag


The bug out bag (or 72-hour bag, or whatever you want to call it) is designed for this kind of thing. It’s bigger (the 5.11 3 Day Rush Backpack is a great example of one, and one of my favorites. I’ll be talking more about this bag in the future). It can hold spare clothes, soap, spare portable water filters, different ways to start a fire, and so on. It’s the basic prepper leaving-home kit. Unfortunately, we’re limited in how much we can carry over long distances and a bug out bag only has so much room.

Family camping tents are really awesome to have but there’s no way you can carry most of them in a backpack. What they do have, however, is a type of tent called a backpacking tent. They’re much smaller and lighter. Unfortunately most of them suck and weigh too much for the space you get.

Let me introduce you to what’s called lightweight backpacking. Depending on the source and just how much weight, you might also call it ultralight or featherweight backpacking. This idea is where you go off into a hiking trail for several days with just what you can carry, and you try to make it as light as possible. Some of these guys go out with less than 20 pounds. These guys live for this stuff and guys like Philip Werner go out and actually use this stuff all the time and tell you about it. They’re a wealth of knowledge.

Now as a thru-hiker or a prepper, you should be able to do that eventually as well with proper prior planning but you’re also trying to design a system where you’ll be ready for many conditions. It’s one thing to head out into the woods with just a tarp and a mat if you know that the weather’s going to be fairly nice, but you can’t rely on that – especially if you have no idea when you’ll be going, or not even 100% for sure where you’re going.

If you’re planning on spending days at a time out in the wilderness either hiking for fun or getting out of dodge while some craziness is happening at home, you may need a bit more shelter than a tarp can provide, especially if you want to have some level of comfort and protection from cold and rain (and bugs). But what can you really do about it. You can only carry so much gear.

I know all kinds of ways to make a shelter from an 8×8 tarp …

66-Shelters-and-Tents-That-Can-be-Made-from-Tarps http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

click for a larger size

… but a tarp can only shelter you so much. Personally, I carry a tent in my bug out bag. Here are some differences explained between ultralight double-walled, tarp, pyramid, catenary cut tarps, flat tarps, and hammock shelters. You can certainly decide to use a tarp as your bug out shelter, and I encourage you to have one even if you do have a tent, but you definitely aren’t going to be as comfortable.

I know some people have a hammock with a tarp and bug netting (the number one solution when I polled readers on my facebook page) but you have to have a couple sturdy trees nearby (which I never do here) and they suck for sleeping 2. Total weight on them is like 4.5 pounds or thereabouts, which is close to some ultralight tents. A common combination is the Eagles Nest Outfitters’ OneLink Sleep System with Double Nest Hammock
.

OneLink Sleep System with Double Nest Hammock and Tarp http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

OneLink Sleep System with Double Nest Hammock and Tarp

 

Luckily, due to these ultralight camping people, there’s an entire industry out there of quality, lightweight equipment, and a LOT of that equipment is exactly the same kind of things that you’d use in a bug out bag – and you can now get something in the same weight class as the hammock system, but have a real tent! Also, some of these tents even take up less space than the hammock/net/tarp system does.

My friend Adam Short is currently on a walking trek around the whole island of the U.K. right now (6600 miles!). He carries a Gelert Solo tent with him to sleep in. He’s doing it to raise money for Save the Children. If you would like to help him support Save the Children, please visit his Save the Children JustGiving page and donate. Or if you’re in the UK, you can text “UKTK99 £AMOUNT” to 70070.

Gelert Solo Tent

I’ve had a Köppen Maelstrom 2 for a while now but I just picked it up to have something while I did my research (and if you’ve read my blog before, you know how deep I get into my research). I was going to link it for you but it’s apparently been discontinued.

koppen maelstrom 2

My first backpacking tent

You can kind of see it in the image of my portable solar power box article where I took it out camping with my neighbors:

A portable prepping/camping solar AC/DC power box you can make at home http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Camping near Flagstaff with the Yaesu 857d ham radio and my homemade solar power box

Now it’s a great tent for what I paid for it:

  • It’s 4 pounds, 6 ounces. Definitely no problem to tie it to the outside of my pack or the handlebars of my Desert Warrior Harley.
  • It had a hydro-blok bottom, which meant I wouldn’t get soaked underneath if it (ever) rained.
  • The low profile was great for keeping me warm outside in the winter and against hard winds.
  • It was on sale when I got it.

Trail Tested: A Thru-Hiker’s Guide To Ultralight Hiking And Backpacking

but it had some issues:

  • It’s a single door, end-opening, tube-type tent.
    • It’s actually more of a hassle than I thought it would be to get in and out of it and grab things from inside when I need them.
    • It also has no way to get a breeze in it.
  • It’s not a freestanding tent, meaning I have to stake it to get it to stand. I live in the desert.
    • The desert ground sucks for trying to get a good grip unless you go for crazy long stakes.
    • There are also VERY few trees or large plants that you can tie off to here.
  • It’s not a very sturdy tent.
    • The stakes SUCK.
    • The fabric hasn’t torn yet but just barely.
  • I didn’t like the vestibule area (the porch part just outside the door).
    • The specs say it has a 14.2 square foot vestibule area but that’s pure BS. Due to the low angle of the fabric, most of that is unusable.
    • You have to reach far down to the very tips of the flaps to secure or open the vestibule to get out.

One thing I found over the years of growing up in the woods is that if you’re doing more than an overnight thing, a tent is a bit more important of a comfort item than you might think. I’d rather add a couple of pounds of weight to my pack to get more space (especially vestibule area). This tent is ok as a backup, and I could easily live out of it if I needed to (provided it didn’t break), but it isn’t what I want or need. Plus, I’m a bit older now so I’ll put comfort and convenience more to the right of the scale of necessities than I used to.

Today, we’ll be talking about tents that I would personally consider (and at one point or another in my long search for a replacement – did consider). Now I know that I get people on this page that have the attention span of a gnat so I’ve made a super-simple, quick list of the 9 that you can check out if you just wanna be a lemming and follow what someone else says. Otherwise, read on and I’ll tell you the specs and some other reviews of each, as well as some videos that you might want to see to get a real good walkaround of each.

EVERY tent on this list is a good choice. Some are better than others, and you’ll find (as expected) that the further down on the list you go, the better tent you’re getting. You just need to figure out exactly what you need in a tent and pick one.

Depending on which tent and which backpack you have, you may need to strap it to the outside of your bag with an attachment system but the Tribe One PackNet Shock Cord with PackTech Attachment System is perfect for that.

Specifically, we’ll be talking about these tents:

  1. Kelty Salida 2 Backpacking Tent
    • Packed Weight: 4 lbs 8 oz
    • Price Range: $100-$200
    • least expensive and a good beginner bug out bag
  2. Nemo Espri LE 2 Person Tent
    • Packed Weight: 5 lbs 4 oz
    • Price Range: $200-$300
    • a step up from the Kelty but still a good budget tent
  3. Vaude Hogan Ultralight 2 Tent
    • Packed Weight: 3 lb 15 oz
    • Price Range: $200-$300
    • lowest-priced real quality tent of the list
  4. Nemo Equipment Obi 2 Tent
    • Packed Weight: 3 lbs 10 oz
    • Price Range: $300-$400
    • higher quality version of the Espri and has better features
  5. Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2 Tent
    • Packed Weight: 2 lb 5 oz – less than a bivy sack
    • Price Range: $300-$400
    • lightest of the bunch
  6. Big Agnes Copper Spur UL 2 Tent
    • Packed Weight: 3 lb 2 oz
    • Price Range: $350-$450
    • very similar to the Fly Creek but has more room
  7. MSR Carbon Reflex-2 Tent
    • Packed Weight: 3 lbs 9 oz 
    • Price Range: $$350-$450
    • best deal for mortals
  8. Hilleberg Nallo 2 Person TentGoldStarGoldStarGoldStarGoldStar
    • Packed Weight: 5 lbs 5 oz
    • Price Range: $650-$700
    • A whole different league than the others
  9. Hilleberg Nallo GT 2 Person tentGoldStarGoldStarGoldStarGoldStarGoldStar
    • Packed Weight: 6 lbs 3 oz
    • Price Range: $750-$800
    • a different version of the Nallo 2 above and my choice

 

The key here is to find a good quality tent that’s light and doesn’t take up too much room when packed up. I’ve taken a lot of the work out of doing that for you and I’m listing several choices here for you. Any of these would be a great tent to carry in your bug out bag or INCH or whatever – or to keep in your vehicle or RV in case you need it. One thing you’ll find out real quick with the good stuff – it’s priced like the good stuff. Luckily though, prices on hi-tech lightweight gear has come down a lot over the past few years. You can now get a really great tent that will fit on your bug out bag (and even in, in some cases) for not much more than a normal tent – but it’s still gonna be a bit more.

I’d suggest a 3-season tent if you live in a warmer climate because they’re the most flexible without gaining a lot of weight. You can add insulation inside or outside if you end up using it in the wintertime a lot better than you can with a lighter tent, and you don’t have to lug around a four-season tent for the rest of the time. If you don’t really know what you’ll be getting into, or are heading into the mountains, you should look at the 4-season tents as well.

If you notice, I’ve chosen only 2-person tents. You can shave off even more weight and space if you go with a one-person tent but they’re just not something I’d recommend. You’ll want to bring in your gear into the tent with you and you can’t do that with a one-person tent. But hey, it’s your tent.

If you have two people, and you know you’ll have two people, a lot of people share the load of a 3-person tent. You could set things up that way to begin with or keep the tent with one person and split it out when you move out. If you’ll be carrying it yourself, I’d suggest staying at about 6 pounds or less.

Now I understand that a lot of people wouldn’t consider anything over 4 pounds as ultralight but this is ultralight with some options. If you really want ultralight, just sleep in your clothes.

I decided to put these in order by cost, or at least by the cost of what I found looking today. Several of these have substantial discounts at the moment so they may not be in the exact price order, depending on when you read this (shame on you for not subscribing to my newsletter so you know when I post.

Remember: you only pay for a tent once; you have to live with that purchase every time you’re in it.

Just get something that you’ll be happy with. You can skimp on other things like pogey-bait and a maybe fewer John Tesh CDs.

I put a video on each one so you can see how they look walking around them, and so you can get another person’s impression of them. The product descriptions are from the manufacturer or from what I could piece together from different reviews to give you better information. If there’s something specific you need in a tent, do your own due diligence before you buy it. I didn’t run out and buy all these tents, I just did a crapton of research to put this together for you.


Kelty Salida 2 Backpacking 2 Person Tent

Kelty Salida 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Minimum Weight: 3 lbs 12 oz / Packaged Weight: 4 lbs 8 oz

This is the least expensive (at the time of writing but it had a substantial discount for that) but it’s certainly not a bad tent. It’s a good value, has a gear loft, it’s easy to set up and it has a little gear loft. It was the winner of the 2011 Backpacker Magazine Editor’s Choice Awards. It’s one of the best-selling backpacking tents on the market. If budget is your primary concern, get this tent.

It’s not made of the same quality that the tents at the end of the list are but it’s a good one to get started with. The tent stakes suck though. This set will fix that, and will cut down your weight a bit – MSR GroundHog Stake Kit (you’ll need 2 kits to have enough to cover the 10 for the tent but you’ll have spares in case you lose any.

Product Description

FEATURES of the Kelty Salida 2 Person Tent Freestanding design Color coded clip construction Taped floor seams Gear-loft loops ArcEdge Floor Mesh wall panels Internal storage pockets Noiseless zipper pulls Taped seams Side-release tent/fly connection Noiseless zipper pulls Guyout points

SPECIFICATIONS of the Kelty Salida 2 Person Tent Season: 3 Capacity: 2 person Number of Door: 1 Number of Vestibule: 1 Number of Pole: 2 Minimum Weight: 3 lbs 12 oz / 1.7 kg Packaged Weight: 4 lbs 8 oz / 2.0 kg Floor Area: 30.5 square feet / 2.8 square meter Vestibule Area: 10 square feet / 0.9 square meter Dimension: 88 x 55 x 43″ / 224 x 140 x 109 cm Packed Dimension: 7 x 22″ / 18 x 56 cm Pole Type: DAC Pressfit Wall Material: 68D Polyester Floor Material: 68D Nylon, 1800 mm Fly Material: 75D Polyester 1800 mm

  • Poles: 2 DAC Pressfit aluminum
  • Freestanding design
  • Taped seams on ripstop nylon floor and rainproof dome fly
  • Mesh wall panels provide adequate ventilation with minimal condensation
  • Floor area measures 30.5 square feet with an additional 10-foot vestibule
  • Three-season, two-person backpacking tent
  • Weighs 3 pounds, 12 ounces unpackaged
  • Weatherproof and sturdy in the stormiest conditions

Dimensions:

  • Minimum weight: 3 lb 12 oz / 1.70 kg
  • Packaged weight: 4 lb 8 oz / 2.04 kg
  • Floor area: 30.5 ft2 / 2.83 m2
  • Vestibule area: 10 ft2 / .93 m2
  • Length: 88 in / 223.5 cm
  • Width: 55 / 45 in / 139.7 / 114.3 cm
  • Height: 43 in / 109.22 cm
  • Packed diameter: 7 in / 17.78 cm
  • Packed Length: 22 in / 55.88 cm

Video:

 


Nemo Espri LE 2 Person Tent 2 Person

Nemo Espri LE 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657Minimum Weight: 4 lbs 4 oz /  On the Fly Weight: 3 lbs 2.3 oz / Packed Weight: 5 lbs 4 oz

This tent is one step above the Kelty. Not just on the list but in what you’re getting. It’s just simply a better tent. You do have to hold about 12 ounces more weight but I think it’s worth it if you’re looking to save money and still get a great tent that you can actually carry on your bug out bag or backpack. This is a good tent for the money. It’s up toward the heavier tents on the list but you can save some cash from the higher-quality tents.

Product Description

FEATURES of the Nemo Espri LE 2 Person Tent A rear scoop vent keeps the rear vent deployed at all times, allowing low-to-high ventilation The vent construction is fully seam-taped and weatherproof Aggressive cutouts in the fly keep excellent tension and allow air circulation, even in the rain Interchangeable vestibules provide flexibility: the simple Ultralight Fly Door, Standard Vestibule, and the optional Trekking Pole Vestibule (shown) Optional Gear Loft with Light Pockets adds overhead storage without compromising floor space or elbow room The SPECS of the Nemo Espri LE 2 Person Tent Capacity: 2 Person Minimum Weight: 4 lbs 4 oz / 1.9 kg On the Fly Weight: 3 lbs 2.3 oz / 1.4 kg Packed Weight: 5 lbs 4 oz / 2.4 kg Floor Dimension: 87 x 52″ / 221 x 132 cm Interior Height: 40″ / 102 cm Floor Area: 30 square feet / 2.8 square meter Vestibule Area: 9 square feet / 0.8 square meter Packed Dimension: 17 x 7″ Packed Diameter: 43 x 18 cm Shell: Mesh / 30D PU Nylon Fly/Vestibule: 30D PU Nylon Ripstop Floor: 30D PU Nylon Ripstop (5000mm) Stuff Sack Style: Drawstring Frame: 3 Aluminum Poles Standard Vestibule Area: 9 square feet / 0.8 square meter Trekking Pole Vestibule Area: 21 square feet / 1.9 square meter Included Accessories: Drawstring style stuff sack, Ultralight Fly Door, Standard Vestibule, stakes, guy-out cord, repair kit Optional Accessories:Trekking Pole Vestibule, Footprint, Pawprint, Gear Loft

OVERSIZE ITEM: We cannot ship this product by any expedited shipping method (3-Day, 2-Day or Next Day). Even if you pick that option, it will still go Ground Shipping. Sorry for being so mean.

ALL CLIMBING SALES ARE FINAL. This product can only be shipped within the United States. Please don’t hate us. Nemo products cannot be shipped to Japan. Please don’t hate us.

  • Tent Design Double Wall, Freestanding
  • Capacity 2 person
  • Season 3 season
  • Doors 1 Door
  • Floor Area 28 ft2 / 2.6 m2
  • Vestibule Area 9 ft2 / 0.84 m2
  • Floor Dimensions 4 ft 4 in X 7 ft 3 in / 1.3 m X 2.2 m
  • Peak Height 40 in / 102 cm
  • Number of Poles 3
  • Pole Material Aluminum

Video:


Vaude Hogan Ultralight 2 Persons Tent, Orange

http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Minimum Weight 3 lb 12 oz / Packed Weight 3 lb 15 oz

If you upgrade the stakes that come with this, this is a really good tent. It’s probably the first one on the list that I’d actually consider now that I’ve done so much research but I think the others below each have at least something a bit improved over this tent that would justify the extra cash.

Tom Allen wrote up a review about this Vaude Hogan ultralight tent that you should probably read. He had it for several years and used it in several countries, bicycling for LOTS of miles. Here are a couple quotes that you may find interesting. I liked his review so much that I kept wanting to quote every paragraph but here are the highlights:

My Vaude Hogan Ultralight 2-man tent has performed almost flawlessly for four years of regular touring use between 2007 and 2011. The design is well suited to a solo cycle tourer or a very cosy couple, especially if you’re expecting harsh weather conditions. 

The size is perfect for a solo cycle tourer — you have enough space for your panniers, clothes, books and yourself on the inside, and any excess baggage in the porch.

The v-profile stakes are strong, but not the strongest. Make sure you plant them fully if possible, as otherwise you WILL tread on and consequently bend them in the dark and/or sleepy daze that you will inevitably find yourself in a some point. My experience with MSR’s stakes, for example, is noticeably better in terms of weight/strength ratio.

This would be an ideal tent for a solo tourer on a tour likely to involve challenging weather conditions, including high winds and plenty of rain. It would sleep two if needed, but with little comfort, and so I would only consider it a two-person option for shorter trips or if weight was at a real premium. If weather is less likely to be a concern, there are more livable tents on the market at a similar weight, price-point and quality. But overall this is a well-designed and very capable tent, which I was happy to call home for many years.

Product Description

The Vaude Hogan Ultralight has the smallest packing concept, is extremely storm-proof, lightest 2-person tent and now offers even more room for your feet. For minimalists that don’t want to compromise on weight and stability, with standardized 100% waterproof taped seams this is the tent for you. The double-sided silicon flysheet offers excellent water resistant properties and extreme durability. The laminated polyamide floor is waterproof up to 10,000 mm – and resists formic acid and aggressive fertilizers. Features: Factory-sealed and taped seams, Free-standing design sheds wind for extra storm stability, 1 Door, Fly 40D Polyamid Ripstop 240T siliconized 3.000mm, Inner Tent: 30D Polyester Ripstop 285T F, 1.5 Poles. Type: Ultralight, Season: 3 Season, Capacity: 2 Person, Number of Doors: 1 Door, Dimensions: 90.5 x 47 in. – Head Height: 39in., Min Weight: 4.14 lbs., Packaged Weight: 4lbs., Weight (lbs): 3.00 to 4.49, Packed Size: 22 x 6in., Number of Vestibules: 1 Vestibule, Number of Poles: 2 Poles, Pole Material: 7001 Aluminum, Floor Material: 100% Polyamide 40D 240T Ripstop Polyurethane Laminated 10000mm, Fly Material: 100% Polyamide, Wall Material: 100% Polyester 30D 285T, Gear Loft Included: No, Footprint Included: No, Model Year: 2012, Product ID: 255305, Shipping Exclusion: This item is only available for shipment by UPS to the lower 48 United States. APO, FPO, PO BOX, Hawaii, and Alaska shipments may not be possible for this item. (Please call prior to purchase.), Special Order: This is a Special Order item, will be shipped from the manufacturer, and is not stocked in our warehouse. This item does not qualify for our Price Matching Policy. Order processing time may vary., Model Number: 723050, GTIN: 4021573973368

  • Weight 3 lb 15 oz / 1.8 kg
  • Minimum Weight 3 lb 12 oz / 1.7 kg
  • Sleep Capacity 2 Person
  • Floor Space 33.9 sq ft / 3.15 sq m
  • Vestibule Space 20 sq ft / 1.86 sq m
  • Max Inside Width 49 in / 124 cm
  • Max Inside Length 92.5 in / 235 cm
  • Head Height 41 in / 105 cm
  • Packed Size 12 x 7 in / 30 x 18 cm
  • Poles Anodized aluminum 7001 T6 alloy
  • Best Use Backpacking
  • Body Material 15D Polyester fine mesh
  • Floor Material 30 denier polyester ripstop 285 T
  • Rainfly Material 30D PU Nylon
  • Freestanding Yes
  • Seam Taped Yes
  • Seasons 3 Season

According to Backpackinglight’s review:

  • One piece pole system connects together in a “+” shape, improving stability and keeping the pole system light
  • Quick set up – takes about two minutes with a little practice
  • Lightweight – the design and materials were selected to keep weight at a minimum
  • Very compressible – the tent and fly minus poles will easily shrink to half the size of its spacious 22″x7″ stuff sack
  • Well ventilated – when staked taut there is a large air gap between the breathable tent fabric and the fly on all sides, additional weatherproof venting is provided by zipping down the top of the covered fly entrance
  • Original stakes bend too easily under normal use and should be upgraded

Video:


Nemo Equipment 2011 Obi 2-Person Ultralight Backpacking Tent

Nemo Equipment 2011 Obi 2-Person Ultralight Backpacking Tent http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Minimum Weight: 3 lbs / Packed Weight: 3 lbs 10 oz

This tent is the high-performance version of the Nemo Espri. I love that it opens on both sides so you can get to whatever you need to very easily, no matter how your tent is arranged according to your camp and the prevailing winds. And a big thing that you probably never knew unless you’ve been in a tent with two doors is that having two doors REALLY makes it nice to open them up and get a breeze going through the tent to cool you off and get rid of that funky smell after several days.

You’ll definitely want a footprint with this one (it’ll add 8.6 ounces) if you intend on using it frequently due to how light and thin the fabric is but it’ll hold up to some pretty serious weather.

Here‘s a typical review that I found after reading several. It’s from Mark Thompson on backpackgeartest, who stayed in it through different seasons and even with his wife. Here’s a couple of relevant quotes:

The tent has performed wonderfully! I am so very happy with the overall weight of the tent and how well it packs into my internal frame pack. I find that so many tents have kept up with the latest developments in terms of assembly, weight, new materials etc., but fail to fit easily into today’s internal frame pack. The NEMO Obi 2P tent poles fit wonderfully on the outside of my pack in their own sack, while the footprint, tent and rain fly all fit snugly in a stuff sack sized to fit easily inside the main compartment of a modern pack.

Commensurate with its low weight, the Obi 2P isn’t a three bedroom villa. The interior dimensions can be a bit tight for two people, for me though, this isn’t a problem. My wife and I typically share a two-person sleeping bag and the Obi’s side doors fit our needs to a tee! The side door design is a great feature when answering nature’s call in the middle of the night. Each having our own door keeps us from disturbing the other through these events.

Product Description

FEATURES of the Nemo Obi 2 Person Tent A large side entry makes entrances/exits easier on the body and provides more coverage in the rain. The large D-shaped door gives you easy access to your gear Dual vestibule/entries on Obi 2P and 3P eliminate jostling for position and gear storage On the Fly configuration is a lightweight tarp structure created by your fly, poles, and footprint. Setup is simple with Jake’s Feet corner anchors Pole hubs at the front and rear of the tent allow multiple poles to intersect at a single point creating a unique pole architecture that allows free-standing support while minimizing pole weight Included Accessories: Dry bag style stuff sack, stakes, guy-out cord, repair kit Optional Accessories: Footprint, Pawprint, Gear Caddy
SPECIFICATIONS of the Nemo Obi 2 Person Tent Capacity: 2 Person Minimum Weight: 3 lbs / 1.4 kg Packed Weight: 3 lbs 10 oz / 1.6 kg Floor Dimension: 82 x 50″ / 216 x 127 cm Interior Height: 40″ / 102 cm Floor Area: 2.5 square meter / 27 square feet Vestibule Area: 1.7 square meter / 18 square feet Packed Dimension: 7.5 x 6″ / 19 x 15 cm Pole Bag: 17″ / 43 cm Shell: Mesh / 20D PU Nylon Fly/Vestibule: 20D PU Nylon Floor: 30D PU Nylon Stuff Sack Style: Dry Bag Frame: 1 DAC 8.5 mm Featherlite NSL Nemo products cannot be shipped to Japan. Please don’t hate us.
  • Obi series of tents are lightest poled tents NEMO makes; overhead pole hub configuration creates more interior volume, without need for an additional ridge pole
  • Raised, waterproof tub floor allows cutouts in fly to save significant weight while improving ventilation; vestibule space can be rolled back for ventilation on starry nights
  • Separate vestibules and entrances eliminate jostling for position and gear storage, with vestibules sized for tucking in pack and shoes at night
  • Two-person tent with three-pound minimum weight and one DAC 8.5-millimeter Featherlite NSL frame; comes with dry bag-style stuff sack, stakes, guy-out cord, and repair kit
  • Includes limited lifetime manufacturer’s warranty
  • Waterproof tent fabric fends off the elements without leaving you feeling stifled by condensation inside
  • Bathtub-style floor provides extra side coverage and allows for cutouts in the fly to reduce weight
  • Mesh canopy vents well and provides panoramic views when the weather’s clear
  • Two large side-entry doors make exits and entrances easier, and the additional vestibule coverage provides your gear with protection from the rain
  • DAC Featherlite poles stand up to abuse and keep weight to a minimum
  • Pole hubs at the front and rear of the tent eliminate the number of necessary poles, thus lowering weight without affecting structural stability
  • Dry-bag style stuff sack, lightweight inner storage pocket, stakes, and repair kit are all included
  • Footprint available separately

Nemo Obi’s gear caddy

Here are some real-life measurements of this tent:

  • Length, interior center to center – 80”
  • Length, exterior corner to corner – 84″
  • Width, interior front of tent, widest point – 48”
  • Width, outside front, exterior, corner to corner – 50″
  • Width, interior, head zone – 45”
  • Width, interior, shoulder zone – 42”
  • Width, interior, from half-way point down to the foot – a constant 40”
  • Width, outside exterior, foot of tent, corner to corner – 42″
  • Height, interior, highest point – 38″
  • Minimum weight – 2 lbs, 14.5 oz
  • Packed weight – 3 lbs, 8.5 oz

I have two videos for you on this tent, all from Handlbarpictures, because they’re great.

Tent setup

The innards

Unlike a lot of other manufacturers, Nemo has an Obi 2-Person Gear Caddy that is made for this tent that can be used to hang gear or a light inside the tent.


Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2-Person Tent

http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657Trail Weight: 1lb 15oz. / Packed Weight: 2lb 5oz

Here’s where we really start to lose some weight. Fully packed, it weighs about the same as a quart of water. This is the tent you want if weight and space are your main goals. It’s the lightest tent on the list but still a good tent. This is also a one that you’ll want to get a footprint for due to the thin fabric.

Product Description

Fly Creek UL series tents are built and designed to be a light weight alternative to the average bivy sack. Available in solo and multi-occupancy options, these tents are ideal for lightweight devotees who want a freestanding structure, but aren’t willing to commit a ton of space in their pack. They are efficient, fast and adventurous, just like those who carry the tent. All DAC poles made from TH72M aluminum: the latest technology in lightweight tent poles featuring improved durability.

Trail Weight: 1lb 15oz. Packed Weight: 2lb 5oz. Footprint Weight: 5oz. Fast Fly Weight: 1lb 7oz. Packed Size: 4″x18.5″. Floor Area: 28 sq ft. Vestibule Area: 7 sq ft. Head Height: 38″. Foot Height: 24″. Trail weight refers to poles, fly and tent body. Packed weight includes poles, fly, tent body, stakes, guy lines, stuff sacks, instructions, and packaging. Fast Fly weight refers to the poles, tent fly and accessory Fast Fly footprint.

  • Three season, free standing, ultralight backpacking tent
  • DAC Featherlite NFL pole system with press fit connectors and lightweight hubs – featuring eco-friendly anodizing
  • All DAC poles made from TH72M aluminum: the latest technology in lightweight tent poles featuring improved durability
  • Fly is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating
  • Floor is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating
  • Tent body is ultralight breathable nylon rip-stop and polyester mesh
  • Mesh body offers excellent ventilation
  • Single hub/pole design makes set up easy
  • DAC Twist clips attach tent body to the pole frame for quick and easy set up
  • Single door and vestibule
  • Mesh pocket included. Located above head at front of tent.
  • Reflective guyline and reflective webbing on tent corners for nighttime visibility
  • All seams taped with waterproof, solvent-free polyurethane (No PVC or VOC’s) tape
  • 11 Superlight aluminum J stakes – featuring eco-friendly anodizing – included
  • Gear loft loops included: Fits Big Agnes TRIANGLE gear loft – sold separately
  • Footprint sold separately

Video:


Big Agnes Copper Spur UL 2 – Two Person Tent

http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657Trail Weight: 2lb 13oz / Packed Weight: 3lb 2oz

This one is a good balance between light weight and durability. Having 2 doors is definitely a plus. It’s the better choice above the Agnes Fly creek if you want more room, but that means it weighs a little bit more. It’s a full square foot larger inside, plus a bigger vestibule area.

Product Description

The Big Agnes Copper Spur UL 2 is a two person, three season, free standing, ultralight backpacking tent. PRODUCT FEATURES: DAC Featherlite NSL pole system with press fit connectors, and lightweight hubs – featuring eco-friendly anodizing All DAC poles made from TH72M aluminum: the latest technology in lightweight tent poles featuring improved durability DAC HClip attaches tent body to cross pole Fly is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating Floor is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating Tent body is ultra lightweight nylon and polyester mesh Mesh body offers excellent ventilation Hub/pole design makes set up quick and easy DAC Twist Clips attach tent body to the pole frame for quick and easy set-up Two vestibules with D-shaped doors and storm flap over zipper Interior mesh pockets Reflective guyline and reflective webbing on tent corners for nighttime visibility All seams taped with waterproof, solvent-free polyurethane (No PVC or VOC’s) tape 10 Superlight aluminum J stakes – featuring eco-friendly anodizing
  • Trail Weight 2lb 13oz
  • Packed Weight 3lb 2oz
  • Footprint Wght 5oz
  • Fast Fly Weight 2lb 1oz
  • Packed Size 5.5″ x 17.5″
  • Floor Area 29sq ft
  • Vestibule Area 9sq ft
  • Head Height 42″
  • Foot Height 22″
  • Updated for 2014, same tent but even lighter
  • Three season, free standing, ultralight backpacking tent
  • DAC Featherlite NFL pole system with press fit connectors, and lightweight hubs – featuring eco-friendly anodizing
  • All DAC poles made from TH72M aluminum: the latest technology in lightweight tent poles featuring improved durability
  • DAC HClip attaches tent body to cross pole
  • Fly is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating
  • Floor is ultralight silicone treated nylon rip-stop with a 1200mm waterproof polyurethane coating
  • Tent body is ultra lightweight nylon and polyester mesh
  • Mesh body offers excellent ventilation
  • Hub/pole design makes set up quick and easy
  • DAC Twist Clips attach tent body to the pole frame for quick and easy set-up
  • Tent body has two rainbow doors
  • Two vestibules with single stake outs and storm flaps over zippers
  • Four interior mesh pockets and two media pockets
  • Reflective guyline and reflective webbing on tent corners for nighttime visibility
  • All seams taped with waterproof, solvent-free polyurethane (No PVC or VOC’s) tape
  • 8 Superlight aluminum J stakes – featuring eco-friendly anodizing – included
  • Gear loft loops included: Fits Big Agnes WALL gear loft – sold separately
  • Footprint sold separately

Video:


MSR Carbon Reflex-2 Tent
http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657Fast and Light Weight: 1 lb 11 oz / Minimum Weight: 3 lbs / Packaged Weight: 3 lbs 9 oz

This and the Big Agnes Copper Spur tie for the best tent for the money in the mortal range. If you want to step things up, you’ll have to move to the demigod tents from here on.

Which one is better between this and the Big Agnes? That’s almost like a Ford vs Chevy thing. Stick has a good review that explains why he likes the Agnes but I just don’t know which I prefer.

Product Description

Amazon.com

Chosen by National Geographic Adventure Magazine editors and a retail advisory board as a 2009 “Best of Adventure Gear Award” winner, the MSR Carbon Reflect 2 tent offers versatility and protection from the elements, at a weight diligent ounce-counters will appreciate. Much lighter and stronger than aluminum, carbon fiber poles reduce the tent’s frame weight by up to 30% over aluminum, while adding significant strength. A full-sized vestibule and covered, window-accessed awning in the rear of the tent offer ample dry storage for your gear, while maximizing internal space.Features

  • Ultra-light: Carbon fiber poles and efficient design make the Carbon Reflex 2 tent incredibly lightweight
  • Advanced Poles: MSR Custom Carbon 6.3 poles weigh up to 30% less than aluminum, with a significant increase in strength
  • Versatile: Straightforward design sets up fast, and pitches with just fly and footprint for added versatility
  • Additional Features: DuraShield-coated fly and bathtub floor, four internal mesh storage pockets, large front door and vestibule, and rear awning with zippered window access

Specifications

  • Two-person, one-door tent
  • Two Easton Carbon FX poles and six stakes
  • 29-square-foot floor area
  • One five-square-foot and one nine-square-foot vestibule
  • 39-cubic-foot tent volume
  • 40-inch interior height
  • Measures seven by 20 inches (W x D) packed

Fabric:

  • 20-denier x 330T ripstop nylon fly with 1,000-millimeter rated DuraShield polyurethane and silicone coating
  • 20-denier x 330T ripstop nylon canopy
  • 20-denier nylon mesh
  • 40-denier x 238T ripstop nylon floor with 3,000-millimeter rated DuraShield polyurethane coating

Weight info:

  • Two-pound, 11-ounce minimum weight
  • Three-pound, one-ounce packed weight
  • One-pound, 14-ounce rainfly/footprint weight
  • One-pound, four-ounce body weight
  • 15-ounce fly weight
  • Eight-ounce frame weight

Lifetime Warranty
MSR products include a limited lifetime manufacturer’s warranty against defects in materials and workmanship.

About MSR
MSR is part of a company named Cascade Designs, started by three friends and former Boeing engineers — Jim Lea, Neil Anderson, and John Burroughs — who were laid off from the aeronautics giant in 1971. Outdoor enthusiasts looking for the next great gear idea, they went on to design the world’s first self-inflating mattress, the Therm-A-Rest. Today, Cascade Designs remains a private, family-owned company that has grown to be one of the most respected outdoor manufacturers in the world.

Videos:

Here’s one that shows you the different configurations of the tent:

Here’s a video that compares the MSR Carbon Reflex 2 and the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2 that may help you decide between the two if you’re where I was in my thinking a few months ago:


 

Mere mortals need not venture beyond this point

The next tent actually comes in two versions, so I’m showing them both. One is better if you want to shave off weight but still want a real tent that could stand up to pretty much any winds or rain (almost) and one is if you want more comfort and are on a more extended trek. The second will stand up to higher winds due to it’s shape but either will crush almost any tent out there that you can buy.

I didn’t go into the uber-high priced ultralight backpacking tents out there because I just don’t think it’s really what you’ll be looking for. They do go the extra mile to shave off every single ounce (and they’re an engineering marvel), but probably should have their own article. If you want to look into those, look into something like the Easton Si2 Cuben 2 or even the Sierra Designs Mojo 2-Person Ultralight Tent. They’re obviously ridiculously awesome tents, but now you’re out of even the demigod range with this type.

You may notice also that these two are 4-season tents, whereas the ones above are 3-season tents. You can stay in much colder temperatures with these and not add hardly any weight.

A HUGE difference is that even though this is a light tent, the fabric is super tough compared to almost anything out there. I’d still get a footprint for it if you’re gonna be spending a lot of time in it but if you want something that will withstand some SERIOUS storms, these two will handle it – as you’re about to see.


Hilleberg Nallo 2 Person Tent Green 2 Person

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - the Hilleberg Nallo 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Minimum Weight: 4 lbs 7 oz / Packed Weight: 5 lbs 5 oz

This is the big daddy. It’s still well within the acceptable weight limit of what you can carry in or on a backpack but it gives you a REAL shelter from the elements. You could literally take this thing mountain climbing or to the arctic. Live For the Outdoors did a nice review of the Nallo 2 (where the image above came from) that you should check out.

From the manufacturer:

THE NALLO 2’S salient characteristic may be its light weight, but it is still fully able to handle all season, all weather adventures. This explains why this tent is the first choice of those needing the lightest weight tent that still offers all-season, all weather functionality. This includes wilderness photographers, professional climbers, hunters, and other adventurers who have to carry large amounts of gear, as well as long distance hikers, who want to get more out of carrying less. Globe-trotting trekkers often carry the Nallo 2, as it ensures they will have private accommodations wherever they go, and solo hikers love having expansive room without any real weight penalty.

Product Description

A wood-burning Titanium backpacking/camp stove?

FEATURES of the Hilleberg Nallo GT 2 Person Tent Kerlon 1200 outer tent fabric and 9 mm poles – make for a supremely stable yet very lightweight tent Pitching requires only four pegs, yet additional peg and guy line points – 11 on the Nallo and 16 on the Nallo GT- provide a myriad of options for increasing stability. Remarkably strong Spectra guy lines are attached at two points on all pole sleeves on both sides of the tent.
The front vent on the Nallo GT also has an attached guy line, and the Nallo’s front vent has a loop for guy line attachment Both maximize interior space by having full sitting height closest to the front, where you need it most, as well as one vertical inner tent entrance, and, because of the tunnel design itself, near-vertical side walls A single entrance and vestibule afford easy access and plenty of storage space, but keep the weight very low.
The Nallo GT’s extended vestibule provides even more storage space The Nallo GT’s extended vestibule has two entrances, one on the side and the other, up front, on the opposite side, thus providing maximum entry and exit flexibility The entire front of the Nallo GT’s vestibule can be rolled away to create a tunnel-shaped opening which has full tent width and enough depth to keep all but the worst weather away from the inner tent door.
The inner tents in both the Nallo and Nallo GT models can be taken out and the Nallo Mesh Inner tents can be used instead.
The Nallo and Nallo GT’s ventilation system functions regardless of weather conditions, thanks to their integrated components Highly breathable yet water repellent inner tent fabric The inner tent door has a full no-see-um mesh panel covered with an equal sized, zipper-adjustable fabric panel A large front vent in the vestibule is placed high enough to keep air moving even if the tent is dug down into deep snow The front vents are backed with an adjustable, air-permeable snow-proof panel that is accessible from inside the vestibule Adjustable fabric-back
  • Poles 2, DAC Featherlite NSL 9 mm
  • Fly Fabric Kerlon 1200
  • Entries 1
  • Tent Weight 2.0 kg (4 lb 6 oz)
  • Pole Weight 302 g (10.7 oz)
  • Stakes, Weight 16, 185 g (6.5 oz)
  • Stuff Sacks 55 g (1.9 oz)
This tent packs to about a 19″ x 6″ size if you don’t split it up to two people, compared to the Nallo 2, which packs to about 19″ x 5″.
Most of the serious adventurers I’ve seen go with the next model (the Nallo GT 2) so you’ll find more videos of it but a lot of what you’ll see will be applicable to the Nallo 2 as well.

Video:

Here’s the official pitching instructions so you can see how it goes together:


This is my favorite tent, above all the tents that I’ve researched – even the ones that cost a lot more money.

This is almost the same tent as above, with a few differences that we’ll go into here. The most glaring difference is that this has an extended vestibule (tent porch). I REALLY like that. It keeps your gear dry and covered without having to bring things into your sleeping area, and this one’s actually big enough that you could cook in that area with a camping stove. If you have a second person with you, this is really the only 2-person tent that’s quite livable. If SHTF, Emma Watson may have a bug out plan in place, but I’ll be ready just in case.

It’s a no-brainer to get this model instead if you’ll be packing it in a car or on your motorcycle though. It’s about a Benjamin more. I would have easily paid $100 to have had something like this on my tent on several occasions.

Hilleberg Nallo GT 2 Person tent
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - the Hilleberg Nallo 2 GT http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657Minimum Weight: 5 lbs 1 oz / Packed Weight: 6 lbs 3 oz

Now you may think that this is a heavy tent (compared to the rest), but it actually weighs less that a lot of two-person tents with no vestibule on the market – and will withstand WAY more bad weather.

As you can see, this one’s about 14 ounces heavier but it’s also larger in the porch area. This image will really explain it a lot better than I can.

ultralight backpacking tents for your bug out bag - nallo 2 vs nallo 2 gt compared

Click to open up to a larger version

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - the Hilleberg Nallo 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - the Hilleberg Nallo 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - the Hilleberg Nallo 2 http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

Both can be used with just the mesh only for a nice breeze

Product Description

If you have a truck, you might actually want one of these instead

FEATURES of the Hilleberg Nallo GT 2 Person Tent Kerlon 1200 outer tent fabric and 9 mm poles – make for a supremely stable yet very lightweight tent Pitching requires only four pegs, yet additional peg and guy line points – 11 on the Nallo and 16 on the Nallo GT- provide a myriad of options for increasing stability. Remarkably strong Spectra guy lines are attached at two points on all pole sleeves on both sides of the tent.

The front vent on the Nallo GT also has an attached guy line, and the Nallo’s front vent has a loop for guy line attachment Both maximize interior space by having full sitting height closest to the front, where you need it most, as well as one vertical inner tent entrance, and, because of the tunnel design itself, near-vertical side walls A single entrance and vestibule afford easy access and plenty of storage space, but keep the weight very low.

The Nallo GT’s extended vestibule provides even more storage space The Nallo GT’s extended vestibule has two entrances, one on the side and the other, up front, on the opposite side, thus providing maximum entry and exit flexibility The entire front of the Nallo GT’s vestibule can be rolled away to create a tunnel-shaped opening which has full tent width and enough depth to keep all but the worst weather away from the inner tent door.

The inner tents in both the Nallo and Nallo GT models can be taken out and the Nallo Mesh Inner tents can be used instead.

The Nallo and Nallo GT’s ventilation system functions regardless of weather conditions, thanks to their integrated components Highly breathable yet water repellent inner tent fabric The inner tent door has a full no-see-um mesh panel covered with an equal sized, zipper-adjustable fabric panel A large front vent in the vestibule is placed high enough to keep air moving even if the tent is dug down into deep snow The front vents are backed with an adjustable, air-permeable snow-proof panel that is accessible from inside the vestibule Adjustable fabric-back

This tent packs to about a 19″ x 6″ size if you don’t split it up to two people, compared to the Nallo 2, which packs to about 19″ x 5″.
Oranged.to did a great review of this tent. Here’s a glimpse of what they thought:
I have to rate the Nallo 2 GT as a fantastic tent in all areas, It’s hard to find the right balance between weight, pack size, durability, colour and internal dimensions. I think that Hilleberg have really pulled a rabbit out of the hat with this tent and I would highly recommend it to anyone looking for a tent that they can use in a wide variety of situations. It’s flexibility is a real winning factor for me. No longer do I need to have a snow tent, summer tent, tropics tent etc.. The hilleberg does them all with relative ease. The annex is HUGE compared to all the other tents that we have found in this category.

Video:

Wanna know how tough this level of tent is? Here’s a quote from Dave’s Wild Camping of a trip they spent on Knock pike where the winds got over 85 mph – that’s in the hurricane range!

Going over to Paul Themuss who seemed amazingly relaxed with his expensive SLR camera focused on the other Paul’s tent, both in there Hilleberg Soulo’s which were coping well with the 85.5 mph recorded winds, whilst Mr. Kilburn appeared to be rolling around on the ground whilst his Soulo was lifting at the back and his sleeping bag by this time was at the bottom of the hill and his titanium pan lid whizzing around the village of Knock like a UFO.

Don’t believe them? Here’s a video of a those tents and guys in that gale-hurricane force storm with a wind gauge to prove it.

Just because these are pretty cool, here are a few more videos on the Hilleberg tents:

Using Hilleberg tents in the snow, above tree line, in an exposed area

Handling your Hilleberg tent in strong winds

Repairing a tent pole on a Hilleberg (yeah, it comes with a repair sleeve)


Now with every tent, there are a few items that you might want to consider. They make life much easier. Because this is an article about tents for your bug out bag, I’m not gonna go into a big list of things that you might consider for your tent if you were carrying it in a vehicle. Maybe another time. These, however, you should really think about.

Tent Stakes

In most cases, you’ll want to replace the tent stakes (except for the high-end tents that take this into consideration). Stock ones are usually crap. Not only do they bend easily and don’t hold in the ground very well, they’re heavy and bulky. Exactly what you don’t want in bug out gear.

You’ll need to know how many stakes your tent needs so you know how many sets you’ll need.

This is the best option for most people out there that I know of:

MSR GroundHog Stake Kit – 8 pack

Product Description

Made of 7000 Series anodized aluminum. The three sided ‘Y’ design grips the ground better than conventional stakes and they are extraordinarily strong and virtually indestructible.

Easy to see loop of reflective 3 mm power cord for seeing the stakes at night and for easy removal. 7.5 in. long and 0.71 ounces each. 8 per package.
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657


This set is used if you REALLY want to shave off weight.

MSR Mini Groundhog Tent Stake Kit

Product Description

The MSR Mini Groundhog stake is tough, light, (very light, .25 oz) durable and has exceptional holding power for its small size. This stake builds on the proven Y-beam design the original MSR Groundhog™ stake.
The smaller, lighter design saves weight while offering similar performance in medium to firm soil. 7000-series aluminum provides years of strength and durability. Sold in a package of 6. Perfect backpacking stake.’Y’ design holds firmly.

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

 

 

 


If you need stakes to stand up to serious weather, that’s what these sets are for:

MSR Cyclone Stake Kit – 4 pack

Product Description

The MSR Cyclone™ stakes are the perfect choice for creating solid anchor points in soft soil or securing large shelters in a windy environment.
The spiral design, almost 10″ long, constructed of 7000-series aluminum, offers strength and holding power in all conditions. Sold as a pack of four stakes. Includes reflective pull loop.Great for larger tents, canopies and more.Twisted spiral design has impressive holding power.

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657


Tent Footprint/Pawprint

MSR Carbon Reflex 2 tent footprint

A footprint is like a tarp that you put under your tent to protect it from sharp rocks or sticks that could poke up from the bottom and from just general wear. You could just use a tarp (many people do), but if you’re looking at cutting down weight and space in your pack, a tarp is generally too big.

A pawprint is an extra padding that goes inside the tent to protect the floor, make it more comfortable, and can make a BIG difference in how warm you are at night.

A footprint/pawprint is specially-designed to fit and work with your tent. You’ll have to have the right footprint/pawprint for your tent though or you’ll have to make do with something else.

Here are the ones I could find for the tents above:


 

Camping pads/mattresses

Sleeping on the hard ground really sucks. A quality, low-weight but high-padding mattress can not only make things more comfortable, they can be a life-saver to keep you insulated from the ground. This article isn’t about padding but it’s an important enough topic to mention here. I just want to throw out a couple of the best options out there for now.

Therm-A-Rest NeoAir Dream Mattress
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

This is a great pad and one you should consider if you have the room for it.

Thickness: 4″ / 10 cm R-Value: 6.0

The SPECS for Long Weight: 3 lbs 12 oz / 1700 g

Dimension: 25 x 77″ / 63 x 196 cm

The SPECS for Extra Long Weight: 4 lbs 7 oz / 2010 g

Dimension: 30 x 77″ / 76 x 196 cm

 


 

 

Jack’s Plastic Welding Grande Paco Pad

Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657

I only mention it here because I’ve seen a lot of people suggest it and it would be HEAVEN if you could somehow carry the damn thing, but it’s way too big to go in your backpack. It’s 13 pounds of high-density, soft foam. Perfect for a vehicle-carried system though.


Honorable mentions

I’ve looked at a LOT of tents in this search, and a LOT of reviews. In that search, I came across several really good tents that I didn’t choose for one reason or another, yet might be exactly what you’re looking for. I figured I’d list some of them here.

Kelty Grand Mesa 2 Person Tent
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657
Minimum weight: 4 lb 0 / 1.81 kg Packaged weight: 4 lb 10 oz

MSR Fury Tent
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657
Minimum Weight: 6 lbs, 2 oz / Packed Weight: 7 lbs

Eureka! Apex 2XT
Ultralight backpacking tents for your backpack or bug out bag - http://graywolfsurvival.com/?p=3657
Minimum Weight: 6 lbs, 5 oz / Packed Weight: 6 lbs 14 oz

REI Quarter Dome 2 Tent

Trail Weight: 3 lbs. 1 oz. / Packed Weight: 3 lbs. 9 oz.

References:

Tenttrails.com How to Select a TentT22Whitman.org How to Choose a TentScoutStuff.org How to Choose a TentThe Ultralight HandboookThe Ultimate Ultralight Backpacking BookVaude Technology – Tents, Backpacking Tents: How to Choose, SectionHiker: How to Choose an Ultralight Tent or Shelter: Part 1, Kelty Tents and Shelters, Nemo Tents, Hilleberg Tents

Isn’t that awesome? Now you don’t have to be stuck under just a tarp or hanging in a hammock anymore (unless you want to).

Please share this article and comment with your favorite tent. I’d love to hear your experience with any of these tents or any other ultralight or featherweight (or close) tent that you’ve backpacked with – especially if you have pics or video.

About graywolf

I am a military veteran who has deployed to combat theaters in Africa, Iraq and Afghanistan and have almost three decades of military and military contracting experience.

My goal is to help preppers and others understand how to intelligently protect their family and their way of life.

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